UPCOMING HIV/AIDS CONFERENCES…..Globally

Title: 3rd International Conference on Prevention & Infection Control

Dates: 06/16/2015 – 06/19/2015
City: Geneva
Country: Switzerland
Deadline for abstracts: 03/20/2015

http://icpic.com/index.php/conferences/icpic-2015

 

ICHA 2015: XIII International Conference on HIV and AIDS

Paper submissions : February 20, 2015
Notification of acceptance : February 28, 2015
Final paper submission and authors’ registration : March 25, 2015
Conference Dates : May 25 – 26, 2015

https://www.waset.org/conference/2015/05/london/ICHA

Title: 8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment & Prevention
Dates: 07/19/2015 – 07/22/2015
City: Vancouver
Country: Canada
ACTG review deadline: 01/20/2015
Deadline for abstracts: 01/27/2015
ACTG late-breaker review deadline: 05/13/2015
Deadline for late-breaker abstracts: 05/20/2015

http://www.ias2015.org/

 

18th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) 2015
Dates: 11/8/2015 – 11/13/2015
Country: Tunisia

KEY DATES OPEN CLOSE
Call for Abstract January 2015 May 2015
Early Registration January 2015 March 2015
Regular Registration April 2015 July 2015
Late Registration August 2015 October 2015

http://icasa2015tunisia.org/

 

3rd International Conference on HIV/AIDS, STDs & STIs
Dates: 11/30/2015 – 12/02/2015
City: Atlanta
Country: United States

http://hiv-aids-std.conferenceseries.com/

 

World STI & HIV Congress – Brisbane

Dates: 13 – 16 September 2015
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia

http://www.worldsti2015.com/ehome/index.php?eventid=91027&

 

Australasian HIV&AIDS Conference 

Dates: 16 – 18 September 2015
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia

http://www.worldsti2015.com/ehome/index.php?eventid=91027&

 

7th International Workshop on HIV Pediatrics

Dates: 17 – 18 July 2015
City: Vancouver
Country: Canada

http://www.virology-education.com/event/upcoming/7th-hiv-pediatrics-workshop-2015/

 

RRA

Feel free to drop an an email at redribbonadvocate@gmail.com

 

 

 

HIV ANTI-DISCRIMINATION LAW SIGNED – NIGERIA

Finally, Nigeria has joined the list of nations with a HIV anti-discrimination law. The president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, President Goodluck Jonathan has signed the HIV/AIDS anti-discrimination ACT 2014; an action that is not only commendable but also reveals the government’s commitment to the fight against HIV and AIDS in Nigeria.

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The journey to have a legislation which protects the rights and dignity of persons living with and those affected by HIV in Nigeria started as far back as 2005 and after about 9 long years, persons living with HIV now have a legal tool to address  issues of stigma and discrimination across the country.  The benefits of having a HIV anti-discrimination law in place cannot be overemphasized, as it would aid the reduction and possible elimination of discrimination against persons living with HIV  in workplaces, Schools, health facilities and other places of association.

This law could not have come at a better time, in an era where treatment challenges in Nigeria’s HIV/AIDS response seems to be snowballing. This is indeed a silver lining for about 3.4 million people living with HIV in Nigeria and hopefully will encourage more people to access treatment , without fear of being stigmatized.

Beyond the signing of the law, now more than ever there is the need to educate people at all levels on its provisions. Furthermore, it is very imperative for organizations to work together in ensuring that the law is implemented fully.  We also hope that this will spur more states in Nigeria to have a HIV anti-discrimination  law, towing the path of states like Lagos, Benue, Nasarawa etc.

To the Civil society organizations; most notably the network of people living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria, stakeholders, government agencies, partners, activists and non-governmental organizations who have tirelessly lobbied for the signing of the law over the past years, we say KUDOS to you!

Photo courtesy : http://www.flickr.com -93065544

RRA

PANGS OF STIGMA……why we cannot be silent about the bill

Life as a HIV/AIDS advocate can be both challenging and uplifting. It is challenging because daily you are inundated with various issues that cut across treatment, prevention, care and support, which requires strategic and deliberate plans to address. The hardest part is that you can spend years trying to address a singular issue. On the other hand it is uplifting because every act of service is for the benefit of the people you serve. Imagine having to advocate for free ARVs, so people can have access to life saving medicines and finally it becomes reality, viola!  The most interesting part is when there is a breakthrough in policies; advocates/activists quickly forget how arduous it was to effect that change, focusing more on the possibilities; like a long walk to freedom.

Beyond addressing challenges, influencing or contesting policies; it is dealing with the human elements and rigid systems that pose the biggest challenge in the job of a HIV/AIDS advocate/activist. How do you get an adamant government to sign the anti-stigma bill into law? How do you get them to own their response and commit more to domestic funding? How do you get them to see and explore other alternative means of funding as against depending heavily on international donors? How do you get them to increase the budget allocation to health? How do you get them to understand that HIV/AIDS should not be seen as a business venture but as people lives; and every decision has the ability to impact negatively or positively?

I found myself asking some of these questions few days ago, when a young lady I met last year called me feeling dejected and frustrated. Let me take you back a little bit about how we met.  She had called me sometime in March 2014, sobbing profusely over the phone because she had just tested positive to HIV.  I calmed her down the best way I could and asked her to come see me in my office.  Over the weekend, I kept hoping and praying she wouldn’t do something stupid; so I constantly sent her messages, praying the weekend would fly by quickly.   By 9am on Monday she was in my office; hiding behind her sun glasses and I didn’t need anyone to tell me why.

She was worried about how people would treat her, worried about if she would ever get married and have children; she was worried about what would happen to her job, if they found out about her status……she knew there were lifesaving medicines, but her greatest concern was STIGMA and the DISCRIMINATION she was going to face.  I re-assured her that on my job, I have met people who have been living with the virus for years and are productive in their endeavors.

I handed her over to our ART clinician and counselor and kept in touch with her constantly. We became friends and since then I have watched her deal with the reality of her status and she has been handling it well; not letting being positive stop her from chasing her dreams and living her life. Fast forward to 2015, she called me to say she got a better offer in a bigger school (oh by the way, she is a teacher); but the only snag is the school is requesting they carry out series of tests; top of the list is HIV.  She said she knows she will never get the job the moment they find out her status and for the first time in a long time she felt the sense of hopelessness she had, when she first found out about her status.

I was livid. We all know that HIV testing is supposed to be voluntary and it should not be a criterion for hiring people. It should also never be a basis for refusing or terminating one’s employment or admission.  This is the reason why people are afraid to get tested, the reason why people shy away from accessing treatment; because they do not want to be treated differently and denied opportunities they deserve.

I was more livid because the Country is yet to sign its anti-stigma law, one that would protect PLHIVs from being marginalized and denied opportunities. It took a long time for the bill to be passed and now the signing is delayed for whatever reason. A country like Nigeria which has the 2nd highest HIV/AIDS burden in Africa cannot and should not be without an anti-stigma law.  Stigma affects treatment and prevention greatly; that is why we have the “zero stigma/discrimination” goal.

Nigeria was supposed to have signed the anti-stigma bill during 2014 world AIDS day but that never happened and now with all the attention on forthcoming elections, one can only wonder when the bill would be signed.  I am committed to contributing my quota as a HIV/AIDS advocate to ensure that the bill becomes law. Stigma and discrimination can be reduced to the barest minimum when there is a law in place.  We cannot afford to be silent about this; it is long overdue.

Keep Calm

RRA

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: IPPF small grants facility

The International Planned Parenthood is calling for proposals to access small grants facilities …..

Please note: only CSOs working in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Ghana, Senegal, Kenya, Burkina Faso and Uganda are eligible to apply. Please scroll down for French.

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Call for Proposals: IPPF small grants facility

2014 marked the twentieth anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). 2015 is the year the successor to the Millennium Development Goals will be negotiated and adopted. The outcome of these processes will greatly impact future Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) policy, funding and programming priorities at global level and at national level.

Civil society (CS) has a critical role to play in influencing government priorities and positions for the post- 2015 regional and global negotiations. To ensure that CS engagement in these processes is strong, meaningful and has impact IPPF is launching round two of a small grants facility. The facility will support CS engagement in post 2014/15 policy processes. This fund will support CSOs who are working with their governments, at country level, to develop strong positions in support of SRHR. This will enable governments to champion SRHR and population dynamics in forthcoming global policy opportunities related to the ICPD and all the processes that feed into the development of the post- 2015 development framework.

Civil Society & Beyond 2014: Securing and accelerating progress on the ICPD Programme of Action

This fund offers opportunities to increase the capacity and collaboration of CSOs and networks working at the national level in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Ghana, Senegal, Kenya, Burkina Faso and Uganda. To engage with national governments to influence positions for negotiations related to the ICPD beyond 2014 review and the post- 2015 development framework. To position population dynamics and SRHR and the emerging issues as priority issues for post- 15. Grants of up to USD$25,000 or €18,500. IPPF Member Associations are not eligible to apply. All grantees must provide 10% match funding. Multi- partner applications are welcome.

Review the application guidelines and complete the application form to apply.

 This fund supports

  • A clear plan to communicate positive messages about SRHR to governments who are sending delegations to post- 2015 global policy events;
  • A clear plan to participate in government delegations at global policy events and do follow up advocacy at the national level to ensure national follow up of global policy debates. Global policy events are where member states come to discuss and negotiate international rules and guidelines for international development. These events can include: the intergovernmental negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda;
  • Have defined a clear plan for follow up work on accountability and transparency over the following 9 months, at national level.
  • If a CSO has a seat on the government delegation at a global policy event where SRHR is on the agenda, a portion of the funds can be used to support travel to the meeting.

Successful applicants must be able to demonstrate change in the following:

  1. Number of CS representatives on national delegations at global policy events
  1. Number and nature of supportive statements made by national governments on their position in accordance with global SRHR policy
  1. Level of awareness on government position of SRHR in global policy:
    1. Volume and frequency of media coverage favouring SRHR
    2. Number and nature of inquiries from CSOs about SRHR

To apply review the application guidelines and complete the relevant application form. Submit the form and related documentation to songsfund@ippf.org by 09:00 GMT, 28 January 2015

This grants programme was made possible with support from the Government of Germany,  John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Government of The Netherlands..

Kind regards,

Katie Lau |  Project Coordinator- ICPD | External Relations Division
International Planned Parenthood Federation
Central Office | 4 Newhams Row, London SE1 3UZ, UKemail klau@ippf.org |skype Katie.lau8 | phone +44 (0) 20 7939 8217 | webwww.ippf.org

Credit: Global Youth Coalition on HIV/AIDS (www.gyca.org)

RRA